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Posts Tagged ‘food for thought’

If you’re wondering why, say, The Little Sisters of the Poor can’t just sign off on a form and let others go along with the HHS mandate for them, read this (“St. Thomas More, The Little Sisters of the Poor & the Casualness of Conscience,” Tod Worner, January 7, 2014, at Patheos). Well, even if you know already why they can’t, you might want to read the post. It’s a good overview, and a good reminder of some of what’s at stake.

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I Think We May Be Missing Something Very Important

In all too many cases, I think she’s right.

hat tip: @sarahmae on Twitter

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You’ve probably seen this wonderful and wise article elsewhere (in the slang of the day, it has ‘gone viral’), but here you go anyway: Marriage Isn’t For You.

If you haven’t read it, please do. The people around you will appreciate it.

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Dominic Verner discusses Graduation Prayers, “Religious Bullying,” and Our Reason for Joy, over at First Things.

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Back in 1949, C. S. Lewis wrote an essay on the humanitarian theory of justice, and how it leads to tyranny and the dehumanization of citizens, instead of justice. Looking at the verdict handed down for a mass murderer in Norway, John Piper revisits that essay in Life Is Cheap In Norway.

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Gerard Nadal writes:

This book addresses one of the burning issues of our day. With prenatal diagnostics leading to the abortions of the less-than-perfect among us, with parents who are frightened into paralysis by these diagnoses and a medical establishment increasingly surrendering to the cowardice of eugenics, over thirty mothers and three fathers of special needs children have stepped forward to share their journeys.

If one is looking for a feel-good easy read, this book isn’t it. This book tells the story of fear, bewilderment, broken hopes and dreams, and the triumph of love in all of its raw and untamed beauty. It is a window into the human soul, into souls that have been forever transformed by children whose needs call forth what love demands most:

Sacrifice.

For those of us who have known the unspeakable beauty of being loved by another, we know that the love we have experienced has come at a cost to the one who has loved us. They have given us their time, attention; material, spiritual and emotional substance. They have accepted us with our strengths and pursued us in spite of our weaknesses–even because of our weaknesses. They have wrapped us in their love and esteem, and lifted us to heights we never could have attained by our own efforts.

That is the sort of love that flows through this book like a rampaging river, overflowing the banks that would contain it, and flooding the surrounding countryside. It is the sort of love that is desperately sought after in a world desperate for authentic love, and purpose, and meaning.

The stories in this book are the stories a frightened and weary world needs to hear, a world that has bought into the counterfeit culture for so long it mistakes love’s essence–sacrifice–with servility, and fails to see its reciprocity…

Read the whole thing.

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It matters what you base your ethics on.

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