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Posts Tagged ‘Catholics’

Samuel Gregg over at the Acton Institute thinks that, in the new book Light of the World, Pope Benedict XVI shows that he’s a Christian radical. That may not mean what you think it means. Read on to find out.

Even if you’re not interested in anything to do with this Pope, the article addresses core aspects of Christianity in a thoughtful way, and is therefore worth a read.

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In Beyond a House Divided: The Moral Consensus Ignored by Washington, Wall Street & the Media (released today), Carl A. Anderson argues that Americans are far more in agreement on social issues than pundits, the media, and politicians like to think. Book website here.

Anderson is supreme knight of the Knights of Columbus, and a New York Times bestselling author.

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In a post titled Nicholas Sparks: The Safe Haven of Commitment, Tony Rossi writes:

“Love doesn’t mean anything if you’re not willing to make a commitment.”

Though that line is spoken by one of the characters in Nicholas Sparks’ new novel Safe Haven, it’s a viewpoint the best-selling author shares.

With the success of books and movies like The Notebook and Dear John, Sparks has a well-founded reputation for being able to craft romantic stories that touch people’s hearts. But romance alone isn’t enough to create a meaningful, lasting relationship like he’s had with his wife Cathy for over twenty years.

In a recent interview with Christopher Closeup, Sparks explained that he once had a debate with his brother Micah about this very topic. Micah suggested that communication is most important in a relationship. That led Nicholas to ask, “What does communication matter if you’re not committed to each other? People who’ve been married a long time or been in any relationship — whether it’s with your parents or with your children — you know that emotionally, it’s going to go up and down. Love is not a straight line. If you’re committed, you know you’ll work through whatever’s keeping you down, that you’ll come out on the other side, and it will get better again.”

Amen to that. Read the whole piece. It’s got more good observations, and food for thought.

hat tip: The Anchoress

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Sometimes an atheist will find a beacon in the darkness (whether the beacon knows it or not).

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The Anchoress has some thoughtful observations about the mine rescue in Chile here, and here.

 

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From the book Disorientation: How to Go to College Without Losing Your Mind, Peter Kreeft thoughtfully takes on Progressivism. There’s also a website for the book.

The marketing is to Catholic teens headed off to college, and their parents, but if Kreeft’s entry is any indication, it could be valuable reading for teens and adults of all faiths.

hat tip: The Anchoress

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… to some degree depends on what you do and say day in and day out. Joshua Mercer has some practical tips on ways to stop being part of the problem. (Oh, you don’ t think you’re ever part of the problem? Are you sure? How sure?)

(hat tip: CatholicVote Facebook page)

(Yes, I’ve finally gotten on Facebook. I haven’t figured it out yet, but I’m on there.)

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Catholic Vote now has a legislative arm. Check out CatholicVoteAction.org. (If you aren’t Catholic, don’t let that stop you.)

If you know of a Christian attending, or working at, a public university in the United States (or are a Christian in college yourself), you might want to check out SpeakUpMovement.org.

If you want to encourage modesty in young people – and encourage the fashion industry to cater to parents who don’t want their daughters to look like streetwalkers – you might want to check out Secret Keeper Girl.

And – just because I haven’t mentioned them in a while, but I think they’ve done great things – don’t forget The Rebelution.

Please feel free to add to the list in the comments. Thanks.

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Evangelical leader Denny Hartford finds a lot for non-Catholics to appreciate in Fr. Val Peter’s Seven Secular Challenges Facing 21st Century Catholics (Paulist Press, 2009). His lengthy, informative review is here.

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I love stories like this: WWII Italian prisoners of war in Wales used vegetable juice as paint, turning a Nissan hut into a chapel full of artwork – and the chapel is still in use today. More, with pictures, at The Practicing Catholic.

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