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Archive for December, 2010

hat tip: Barbara Curtis

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A little language fun

in vitch speling is adresd

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Norvegian diet

Just since it’s a good, clean Ole joke I hadn’t heard before today, I give you The Norvegian Diet:

Ole was turning 78 and was overweight, so his doctor put him on a diet.

The doctor said, “I want you to eat regularly for 2 days, then skip a day, and repeat this procedure for 2 weeks. The next time I see you, you should have lost at least 5 pounds.”

When Ole returned, he shocked the doctor by having lost nearly 60 lbs!

“Why, that’s amazing!” the doctor said, “Did you follow my instructions?”

Ole nodded… “I’ll tell you though,  I thought I wuz gonna drop dead on dat 3rd day.”

“From the hunger, you mean?” asked the doctor.

“No, it wuz from all dat darn skippin!”

My thanks to my friend Dale, for sending it along in an email.

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Food for thought from Anthony Esolen:

The welfare state begins by compelling people to put money aside for their old age — the fiction of the Social Security trust fund comes to mind.  There, at least, there is some correspondence between what the state takes from you and what the state will give back.  And the state has a genuine interest in keeping people from destitution.   But what happens eventually is that people in charge of a welfare state come to think of all things as belonging to them: children, for instance, are wards of the state, lent out to their parents conditionally; families are creations of the state; money is all the state’s to play with, so that refraining from raising people’s taxes is viewed as a “gift” to them.  I don’t see that.  Nor do I see that Death is some game-scrambler, the great opportunity to ignore the generation-spanning essence of the family, so as to rifle half of an estate, often compelling people to sell a homestead just to pay the taxes on it.

Read the whole post.

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From a Mere Comments post by James M. Kushiner:

Heads, hearts, not to mention C. S. Lewis’s “chest” need to be properly formed, that is to say, informed. Those who object that this amounts to indoctrination are probably most likely to be the most eager to educate your children.

 

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Samuel Gregg over at the Acton Institute thinks that, in the new book Light of the World, Pope Benedict XVI shows that he’s a Christian radical. That may not mean what you think it means. Read on to find out.

Even if you’re not interested in anything to do with this Pope, the article addresses core aspects of Christianity in a thoughtful way, and is therefore worth a read.

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